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Day 1 • Tuesday May 6, 2014
  • 7:00 A.M. - 8:00 A.M.
    Registration
  • 8:15 A.M. - 10:00 A.M.
    Keynote: Jeremy Gutsche Adapt & Disrupt: Capture New Business Opportunities and Stay Ahead of the Pack
  • 10:00 A.M. - 10:20 A.M.
    Nutrition & Networking Break
  • 10:20 A.M. - 11:20 A.M.
    Building a Context for Relationships: Roles, Relationships and Places of Belonging (Part 1)

    Speaker: Janet Klees

    This is a presentation for staff, families and their allies who are serious about exploring and discovering the opportunities for welcomed engagement, and relationships that abound within our communities. If you are in planning mode for transition years, concerned with ensuring that a person is involved in their community in meaningful ways, or wanting to develop a person’s interests and potential in their everyday lives, then this workshop might be just for you!

    Learning Objectives:

    • To identify and plan for the four elements necessary for building a context in which a relationship is more likely to occur.
    • To understand that looking at roles rather than activities is a powerful way to help people spend their time in meaningful ways – and we can start doing so today.
    • To understand that at the heart of a valued role is contribution and to think of the contributions that people are able to offer in a different way.
    All in One, One for All: Communication, Computer Access, and Home Controls in the Integration Age (Part 1)

    Speaker: Ben Adaman

    Smart phones, tablets and other computers play an ever more central role in nearly every aspect of our lives. With new technologies has come a broader definition of communication that goes far beyond face to face interactions. Individuals with physical or cognitive disabilities have a right to access the same mainstream communication options the rest of us take for granted. In this presentation, learn how high-tech AAC systems can meet a wide range of communication and other needs by integrating with power wheelchair controls, providing access to email and the internet, allowing environmental controls, and supporting mouse emulation for switch users.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Access options available for iPads/iPhones, Windows-based computers, and specialized speech-generating devices (SGDs).
    • How SGDs can address clients’ face to face and other communication needs.
    • How specialized SGDs and mainstream technology can serve as environmental control units.
    Stress, the Workplace and Mental Health

    Speaker: Maureen Grace

    Symptoms of stress and mental illness are discussed in this presentation. Workplace Stress, a risk factor for mental illness, will be explored along with an introduction to the New Standard: Psychological Safety in the Workplace. Statistics, symptoms, insight, and tools will be shared.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Understand their personal symptoms of stress
    • Learn several stress management tools
    • Be able to identify symptoms of those struggling with a mental health issue
    • Learn how personality can play a role in what stresses whom
    • Identify the 13 factors of Psychological Safety in the Workplace
    Through the years: the Autism Lifespan

    Speaker: Bobby Newman

    Education for many individuals diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders must be carefully planned to ensure that the individuals’ strengths are accentuated, and any skill deficits or behaviors that are interfering with the learning process are addressed.  Priorities will change over the years, and careful planning with long-term goals in mind must be provided.  Topics that must be addressed will include language skills, play and recreational skills, academic skills, social skills and vocational skill
     
    Learning Objectives:

    • Attendees will learn to individualize language goals.
    • Attendees will learn to individualize play goals.
    Making a Splash: How Can the Aquatic Environment Influence the Lives of Children with Developmental Disabilities? (30 min) & Research Poster Viewing (30 min)

    Speaker: Andrea Cross

    All children have the potential to thrive in the aquatic environment. By learning to swim, children are introduced to a lifelong activity that they can participate in. This presentation will explore the key findings and implications of a paediatric aquatics intervention for children with autism spectrum disorders and communication delays.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Dive into the aquatic environment and explore real-life examples of how it can positively impact children’s health.
    • Splash through the recent developments of the paediatric aquatics field.
    • Surf to shore by examining the potential implications of including aquatic programs in children’s treatment plans, the role of children’s health practitioners and therapists in supporting children’s participation, and the next steps for advancing aquatic programs in children’s health care.
    Just Enough Support (Part 1)

    Speaker: Julie Malette

    Learning Objectives
    Participants will learn and practice person-centered thinking and planning tools that will help them:

    • Develop alternatives to just paid support for people.
    • Continue to develop individually designed services at a time of reduced budgets and access to formal support.
    • Stay true to person-centered values and principles while moving forward.
  • 11:30 A.M. - 12:30 P.M.
    Building a Context for Relationships: Roles, Relationships and Places of Belonging (Part 2)

    Speaker: Janet Klees

    This is a presentation for staff, families and their allies who are serious about exploring and discovering the opportunities for welcomed engagement, and relationships that abound within our communities. If you are in planning mode for transition years, concerned with ensuring that a person is involved in their community in meaningful ways, or wanting to develop a person’s interests and potential in their everyday lives, then this workshop might be just for you!

    Learning Objectives:

    • To identify and plan for the four elements necessary for building a context in which a relationship is more likely to occur.
    • To understand that looking at roles rather than activities is a powerful way to help people spend their time in meaningful ways – and we can start doing so today.
    • To understand that at the heart of a valued role is contribution and to think of the contributions that people are able to offer in a different way.
    All in One, One for All: Communication, Computer Access, and Home Controls in the Integration Age (Part 2)

    Speaker: Ben Adaman

    Smart phones, tablets and other computers play an ever more central role in nearly every aspect of our lives. With new technologies has come a broader definition of communication that goes far beyond face to face interactions. Individuals with physical or cognitive disabilities have a right to access the same mainstream communication options the rest of us take for granted. In this presentation, learn how high-tech AAC systems can meet a wide range of communication and other needs by integrating with power wheelchair controls, providing access to email and the internet, allowing environmental controls, and supporting mouse emulation for switch users.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Access options available for iPads/iPhones, Windows-based computers, and specialized speech-generating devices (SGDs).
    • How SGDs can address clients’ face to face and other communication needs.
    • How specialized SGDs and mainstream technology can serve as environmental control units.
    Lead Them to the Answers

    Speaker: Jennifer Kilimnik

    Learning Objectives:

    • Review a model to facilitate open, nonjudgmental conversations.
    • Develop more collaborative leadership.
    • Reinforce belief that you can support others to find their own solutions.
    Issues of Sexuality in individuals with ASD

    Speaker: Bobby Newman

    Individual diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders, due to the nature of the disability itself, very often have great difficulties in forming social relationships.  This is exacerbated when we talk about even more intimate adult sexual behaviors.  A myriad of social and regulatory issues may form barriers to the individual being able to learn appropriate sexual behavior.  Factors that exist, and how to address these, will be explored.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Attendees will learn to use both classroom instruction and social roleplay to teach the skills related to adult relationships.
    • Attendees will learn to choose a curriculum that is appropriate to the individual and will teach the skills in question.
    Supporting People with Disabilities Through Conversations about Spirituality

    Speaker: Ursula Remillard

    It could be considered self-evident that employees providing support to individuals in all facets of their lives would feel comfortable talking with the people they support and their families, and with each other, about spirituality. Yet, for a variety of reasons, this is often not the case. Depending on their personal background and experiences, employees sometimes are not sure how to respond when individuals express their thoughts or questions about spirituality. Staff may not recognize when a someone is trying to bring up the subject, they may not know the language of spiritual expression, and may not be sure about the appropriateness and timing of such conversations. In these instances, the spiritual component of holistic care may be absent or inadequate.

    Learning objectives:

    • To become aware of the content of the project, and the definition of “Spirituality” used and shared as a starting point for discussion.
    • To begin to recognize the variety of ways that meaningful activity could be presented and supported that would meet the Spiritual needs of individuals they support.
    • To reflect on how current work conversations and activities already support individuals in the exploration of the spiritual dimension of their life.
    Just Enough Support (Part 2)

    Speaker: Julie Malette

    Learning Objectives
    Participants will learn and practice person-centered thinking and planning tools that will help them:

    • Develop alternatives to just paid support for people.
    • Continue to develop individually designed services at a time of reduced budgets and access to formal support.
    • Stay true to person-centered values and principles while moving forward.
  • 12:30 P.M. - 1:30 P.M.
    Complimentary Banquet Lunch: Fort Garry Place Grand Ballroom
  • 1:30 P.M. - 2:30 P.M.
    Transition to Community: A Panel Discussion

    A Transition Steering Committee was created to facilitate a successful transition to community-based services and supports for every individual living in Valley View Centre.  The Valley View Centre Transition Steering Committee, consisting of representatives from the VVC Family Group, Saskatchewan Association for Community Living, and various programs within the Saskatchewan Ministry of Social Services, developed 14 recommendations based on best practices from research they conducted.  This panel discussion will give a brief overview of those recommendations with a special focus on sharing their experience; the challenges, successes and lessons learned from their experience of moving long term residents from a Developmental Centre to community based services.

    Mindful Art

    Speaker: Joyce Douglas

    Art is about an experience. At the same time we should not forget the final product. All of us want to create work that we are proud of, work that is appreciated and work that has meaning. For the past three years St.Amant has worked with our Foundation to create pieces of art that can be sold at an art auction. Each piece is produced by the student artist themselves and each piece has a story attached. This presentation will follow a group of people who live with a developmental disability and/or autism as they produce a variety of different art pieces, and experience a variety of different art mediums. The journey will continue as we take their art and present it in such a way that it increases both its’ social and monetary value. This presentation will give you many ideas on how to be mindful of the experience of art by teaching strategies and techniques to keep the focus on both process and product.

    Learning Objectives:

    • To learn/experience a variety of strategies to help students create art.
    • How and why to make art student centered.
    • To look at the next stage of the creation of art – making a meaningful product.
    Assertive Communication (Part 1)

    Understanding our communication style and how we interact with others is essential to positive and productive relations. Effective communication requires us not only to be aware of ourselves, but also to be responsive and aware of others. Being assertive in communication is the ability to express positive and negative ideas and feelings in a transparent, welcoming and direct way – to state clearly and without defensiveness what one needs. This workshop is fun, practical and highly effective at improving communication awareness and skills.

    Learning Objectives

    Participants of this workshop will build an awareness of their communication patterns and learn to deal confidently with people around them.

    Transitioning and integration in the community and workplace

    Speaker: Bobby Newman

    Individuals diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders often face challenges in the transition to the world of work.  This includes difficulties that may arise due to factors association with the ASD diagnosis itself, such as language or social difficulties or obsessive-compulsive behavior or sensory difficulties.  Careful planning must be conducted to ensure that targeted skills are actually functional and that behavior interfering with independent functioning is addressed.
     
    Learning Objectives:

    • Attendees will learn to assess behavioral difficulties interfering with independent functioning.
    • Attendees will learn to target and teach particular work skills.
    Participatory Media Methods in Research: Exploring the Right to Love (Part 1)

    Speaker: Kathleen C. Sitter

    This workshop explores using participatory visual research approaches in the disability community. Three methods are discussed: participatory video, digital storytelling, and participatory photography. The first session of this three session workshop includes: 1) exploring the theory and philosophy underlying participatory approaches with the disability community; 2) presenting an overview of core elements; 3) discussing forms of analysis and distribution; and 4) considerations with ethics, power, and resources. The second and third sessions of this three session workshop explores an exemplar of participatory research where a group of adults participated in a 12-month research study that used participatory video to raise awareness about the topic of sexual health in the disability community. The topic of sexual health will be explored and members of the study will share their perspectives and experiences in the filming process and how the videos were subsequently used as an advocacy tool. Several of the videos will also be screened.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Develop an understanding of the theory and philosophy underlying the use of participatory approaches with the disability community.
    • Develop a working knowledge of the framework for conducting participatory video, digital storytelling, and participatory photography as research methods.
    • Learn about the strengths and challenges of using participatory research within the disability community with a focus on the areas of ethics, power, and resources.
    • Be able to identify communication channels that can be used to raise awareness of important issues by using participatory research outcomes as a driver for social change.
    • Gain first-hand experiences from members of the disability community that have successfully used participatory video research outcomes to educate broader communities while impacting policy in the area of sexual rights.
    Person-Centred Thinking (Part 1)

    Speaker: Julie Malette

    Learning Objectives:

    Participants will learn and practice person-centered thinking skills/tools that will help them:

    • Explore and gather information about what is important to someone and how to best support them.
    • Capture key information about someone in a useful format called a one-page profile (for more info see:  www.onepageprofiles.wordpress.com).
    • Learn how person-centered thinking is key to being person-centered with colleagues, families as well as people supported by service.
  • 2:30 P.M. - 2:50 P.M.
    Nutrition & Networking Break
  • 2:50 P.M. - 3:50 P.M.
    Using Functional Assessment to Implement Positive Behavior Supports in Classroom Settings

    Speaker: Keith Storey

    This presentation is intended to give teachers and other service providers the knowledge and skills for providing positive behavior supports in school settings. The rubber meets the road in how to teach but also in how to implement positive behavior supports so that instruction can occur for all students. Developing and maintaining appropriate student behavior can be challenging in any classroom and school. Positive Behavior Support strategies reason that the best way to decrease undesirable behaviors is by increasing desirable behaviors and by giving students skills and supports so that they do not need to engage in undesirable behaviors. Having a well-organized classroom in which students are academically and socially engaged is, in many ways, the key to being a successful teacher. Teachers need skills in this area and need to be able to implement positive behavior support strategies that are empirically valid. Too many teachers rely upon a “bag of tricks” (and often it is a limited bag of tricks) and when those tricks do not work they are at a loss as to what to do. This presentation will help teachers to understand the role of the function of undesirable behaviors and what strategies are likely to be effective in classroom settings.

    Learning objectives:

    • Participants will understand the two functions of behavior.
    • Participants will understand how to develop a positive intervention based upon the function of the behavior.
    • Participants will gain an overview of positive behavior support intervention strategies.
    Supporting People with Developmental Disabilities at Medical Appointments: A Pilot Project

    Speaker: Kerry Heather

    Education is cited as being a main benefit to reducing barriers that create disparity in health care for people living with developmental disability. However, few organizations have implemented training programs in support of increasing care provider knowledge related to accessing the health care system in support of people with developmental disability. St.Amant’s Community Residential Program believes that a health appointment training program will fill a gap that contributes to this disparity in health care.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Provide an overview of the health care appointment pilot project.
    • Demonstrate the successes of this project.
    • Identify the obstacles encountered and where we go from here.
    Assertive Communication (Part 2)

    Understanding our communication style and how we interact with others is essential to positive and productive relations. Effective communication requires us not only to be aware of ourselves, but also to be responsive and aware of others. Being assertive in communication is the ability to express positive and negative ideas and feelings in a transparent, welcoming and direct way – to state clearly and without defensiveness what one needs. This workshop is fun, practical and highly effective at improving communication awareness and skills.

    Learning Objectives

    Participants of this workshop will build an awareness of their communication patterns and learn to deal confidently with people around them.

    Decision-Making Process when Choosing Alternative Medicine (30 min) & Research Poster Viewing (30 min)

    Speaker: Tara Hodgson

    The research into the use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) in autism is relatively new; therefore, evidence regarding motivations underlying its use is not extensive. To this end research was needed to discover why parents of children with autism choose CAM. A qualitative study was performed with 15 families in British Columbia using a grounded theory approach to explore, in depth, the decision-making processes of parents who choose CAM therapies for their children with autism. From the data, a theoretical framework “Fighting from the Fringes” was developed that explains the complex processes by which parents of children with autism choose CAM. This theory captures the feelings of disenfranchisement and marginalization from the conventional health care system that was experienced by all parents in the decision-making process, as well as the overall context of stress and isolation in which treatment decisions about CAM were made.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Information and decision-making support required by families of children with autism, for the promotion of family-centred care and a shared decision-making approach to treatment selection.
    • Inform professional practice related to communication and care and will hopefully influence future research and policy development in autism treatment.
    Participatory Media Methods in Research: Exploring the Right to Love (Part 2)

    Speaker: Kathleen C. Sitter

    This workshop explores using participatory visual research approaches in the disability community. Three methods are discussed: participatory video, digital storytelling, and participatory photography. The first session of this three session workshop includes: 1) exploring the theory and philosophy underlying participatory approaches with the disability community; 2) presenting an overview of core elements; 3) discussing forms of analysis and distribution; and 4) considerations with ethics, power, and resources. The second and third sessions of this three session workshop explores an exemplar of participatory research where a group of adults participated in a 12-month research study that used participatory video to raise awareness about the topic of sexual health in the disability community. The topic of sexual health will be explored and members of the study will share their perspectives and experiences in the filming process and how the videos were subsequently used as an advocacy tool. Several of the videos will also be screened.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Develop an understanding of the theory and philosophy underlying the use of participatory approaches with the disability community.
    • Develop a working knowledge of the framework for conducting participatory video, digital storytelling, and participatory photography as research methods.
    • Learn about the strengths and challenges of using participatory research within the disability community with a focus on the areas of ethics, power, and resources.
    • Be able to identify communication channels that can be used to raise awareness of important issues by using participatory research outcomes as a driver for social change.
    • Gain first-hand experiences from members of the disability community that have successfully used participatory video research outcomes to educate broader communities while impacting policy in the area of sexual rights.
    Person-Centred Thinking (Part 2)

    Speaker: Julie Malette

    Learning Objectives:

    Participants will learn and practice person-centered thinking skills/tools that will help them:

    • Explore and gather information about what is important to someone and how to best support them.
    • Capture key information about someone in a useful format called a one-page profile (for more info see: www.onepageprofiles.wordpress.com).
    • Learn how person-centered thinking is key to being person-centered with colleagues, families as well as people supported by service.
  • 3:50 P.M. - 4:50 P.M.
    Assertive Communication (Part 3)

    Understanding our communication style and how we interact with others is essential to positive and productive relations. Effective communication requires us not only to be aware of ourselves, but also to be responsive and aware of others. Being assertive in communication is the ability to express positive and negative ideas and feelings in a transparent, welcoming and direct way – to state clearly and without defensiveness what one needs. This workshop is fun, practical and highly effective at improving communication awareness and skills.

    Learning Objectives

    Participants of this workshop will build an awareness of their communication patterns and learn to deal confidently with people around them.

    Participatory Media Methods in Research: Exploring the Right to Love (Part 3)

    Speaker: Kathleen C. Sitter

    This workshop explores using participatory visual research approaches in the disability community. Three methods are discussed: participatory video, digital storytelling, and participatory photography. The first session of this three session workshop includes: 1) exploring the theory and philosophy underlying participatory approaches with the disability community; 2) presenting an overview of core elements; 3) discussing forms of analysis and distribution; and 4) considerations with ethics, power, and resources. The second and third sessions of this three session workshop explores an exemplar of participatory research where a group of adults participated in a 12-month research study that used participatory video to raise awareness about the topic of sexual health in the disability community. The topic of sexual health will be explored and members of the study will share their perspectives and experiences in the filming process and how the videos were subsequently used as an advocacy tool. Several of the videos will also be screened.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Develop an understanding of the theory and philosophy underlying the use of participatory approaches with the disability community.
    • Develop a working knowledge of the framework for conducting participatory video, digital storytelling, and participatory photography as research methods.
    • Learn about the strengths and challenges of using participatory research within the disability community with a focus on the areas of ethics, power, and resources.
    • Be able to identify communication channels that can be used to raise awareness of important issues by using participatory research outcomes as a driver for social change.
    • Gain first-hand experiences from members of the disability community that have successfully used participatory video research outcomes to educate broader communities while impacting policy in the area of sexual rights.
    Person-Centred Thinking (Part 3)

    Speaker: Julie Malette

    Learning Objectives:

    Participants will learn and practice person-centered thinking skills/tools that will help them:

    • Explore and gather information about what is important to someone and how to best support them.
    • Capture key information about someone in a useful format called a one-page profile (for more info see: www.onepageprofiles.wordpress.com).
    • Learn how person-centered thinking is key to being person-centered with colleagues, families as well as people supported by service.
Day 2 • Wednesday May 7, 2014
  • 7:00 A.M. - 8:00 A.M.
    Registration
  • 8:15 A.M. - 9:30 A.M.
    Keynote: Jennifer Johanessen A Parent’s Journey
  • 9:40 A.M. - 10:40 A.M.
    Person Centered Life Plans & Stories

    Speaker: Matthew Barton

    How to build a Life Plan; respectfully exploring a person’s history, what is happening now, and assisting with expressing a person’s aspirations and dreams for the future. Examples of how the Life Plan process opens communication, enhancing the support network. The person and their story is at the centre of this process.

    Learning Objectives:

    • To obtain knowledge and deepen our awareness of how to facilitate a person’s personal story.
    • To strengthen support for people living in the community.
    • To provide multiple person centered planning tools that promote support, engagement and facilitation.
    Behavioral challenges in swallowing and feeding disorders, motivation and eating pragmatics (Part 1)

    Speaker: Justine Joan Sheppard

    This workshop focuses on the behavioral components of swallowing and feeding disorders in children and adults with intellectual and developmental disability. Topics will include:

    • Understanding the causes and development of behavioral challenges
    • An assessment model for behavioral challenges, Related, personal history, sensory tolerances and psychosocial skills
    • Using evidence based treatments for overcoming behavioral challenges.

    Learning objectives:

    • Participants will be better able to recognize contributing causes of behavioral swallowing and feeding challenges.
    • Participants will be better able to analyze and describe behavioral swallowing and feeding disorders.
    • Participants will be better able to select appropriate mealtime management and treatment strategies for improving behavioral swallowing and feeding challenges.
    Social Media: “Please Leave Your Cell Phone ON!” Connected and Included (Part 1)

    Speaker: Aaron Johannes

    Learning Objectives:

    • We will discuss why social media matters to people with disabilities and those who support them, by discussing several kinds of social media and how individuals can interact to deliver messages about themselves, the groups they are part of and the causes they care about.
    • We will identify various kinds of social media and the strengths and capacities of each, and how multi-platform tools like Hootsuite can help us get our message out. 
    • We will discuss internet safety and create a basic media plan.
    A discussion of ethics in healthcare and education for children with developmental disabilities – a parents perspective
    An introduction to mindful practice: For staff working with children displaying challenging behaviours (Part 1)

    Speakers: Janine Montgomery, Brenda Stoesz

    In this presentation, we will present a summary of the relevant research findings as they relate to reducing stress in staff working with children displaying challenging behaviours. In particular, we will present an overview of the concepts of emotional intelligence and mindfulness practice and attendees will participate in exercises incorporating emotional intelligence and mindfulness to enable an introduction to incorporating concepts in their everyday lives to improve personal well-being and workplace effectiveness.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Learn basic background information about emotional intelligence and mindfulness.
    • Learn practical strategies to incorporate emotional intelligence and mindful living to enable reduced stress related to the challenges they face when working with individuals displaying challenging behaviours.
    • Be provided with resources to learn more about the concepts presented for those who wish to begin incorporating the ideas into daily living.
    Understanding and Addressing Cognitive and Behavioral Flexibility in Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Speaker: Mary E. McDonald

    This workshop will provide an overview of behavioral and cognitive flexibility and the importance of focusing on these areas with students with ASD.  Often students with autism adhere to fixed routines, rote repetitive responding or appear to have limited repertoires of responses.  This workshop will focus on the specific skills that need to be addressed as well as provide some practical strategies for improving behavioral and cognitive flexibility. 

    Learning Objectives:

    • Describe behavioral flexibility and its impact on the ability of students with autism to be successful.
    • Describe cognitive flexibility and its relevance for learning in students with autism.
    • Describe a variety of skills that need to be worked on to increase flexibility in students with ASD.
    • Describe a strategy that can be used to increase behavioral flexibility.
    • Describe a strategy that can be used to increase cognitive flexibility.
  • 10:40 A.M. - 11:00 A.M.
    Nutrition & Networking Break
  • 11:00 A.M. - 12:00 P.M.
    Supporting Workers Who Encounter Challenging Behaviour: Perspectives and Needs / Health Assessments for Adults with Intellectual Disability

    Speaker: Beverley Temple

    Supporting Workers Who Encounter Challenging Behaviour: Perspectives and Needs
    Overview of some of the perspectives of support workers’ who were injured on the job while supporting people who display challenging behaviour. We will provide information about the trends of injuries over all programs of St.Amant, the areas where reporting may indicate differences between manager and support worker’s perspectives and how people are supported after the injury. Participants will have an opportunity to contribute to the discussion of their training and how prepared they feel to support people and how to report accurately to allow the organization to respond appropriately.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Understand the extent and nature of injury risk.
    • Learn about the perspectives of managers and workers who must deal with injuries.
    • Learn how better to support those who encounter injury risk.

    Health Assessments for Adults with Intellectual Disability
    Researchers, practitioners, and decision makers are working together to determine the feasibility of implementing the Comprehensive Health Assessment Program (CHAP) for adults with ID in Manitoba. The CHAP was designed to help minimise the barriers to access primary health care for persons with ID. The study results will be discussed.

    Learning objectives:

    • Participants will learn about the effectiveness of the comprehensive health assessment program (the CHAP) for adults with ID.
    • Participants will learn about the CHAP feasibility study in Manitoba, and why it is important.
    • To seek input from the participants (as care providers, family members, clinicians, or researchers) and assess their perspective regarding utility of the CHAP as a comprehensive health assessment tool for persons with ID.
    Behavioral challenges in swallowing and feeding disorders, motivation and eating pragmatics (Part 2)

    Speaker: Justine Joan Sheppard

    This workshop focuses on the behavioral components of swallowing and feeding disorders in children and adults with intellectual and developmental disability. Topics will include:

    • Understanding the causes and development of behavioral challenges
    • An assessment model for behavioral challenges, Related, personal history, sensory tolerances and psychosocial skills
    • Using evidence based treatments for overcoming behavioral challenges.

    Learning objectives:

    • Participants will be better able to recognize contributing causes of behavioral swallowing and feeding challenges.
    • Participants will be better able to analyze and describe behavioral swallowing and feeding disorders.
    • Participants will be better able to select appropriate mealtime management and treatment strategies for improving behavioral swallowing and feeding challenges.
    Social Media: “Please Leave Your Cell Phone ON!” Connected and Included (Part 2)

    Speaker: Aaron Johannes

    Learning Objectives:

    • We will discuss why social media matters to people with disabilities and those who support them, by discussing several kinds of social media and how individuals can interact to deliver messages about themselves, the groups they are part of and the causes they care about.
    • We will identify various kinds of social media and the strengths and capacities of each, and how multi-platform tools like Hootsuite can help us get our message out.
    • We will discuss internet safety and create a basic media plan.
    Understanding the Disability Trajectory of First Nations Families of Children with Disabilities

    Although research is beginning to address the impact that disabilities have on Canadian children and their families, sorely missing is an understanding of the experiences of First Nations families of children with disabilities. This presentation will highlight findings from a longitudinal qualitative study that examined the perspectives and experiences of 75 First Nations families of children living with disabilities. Overall, the findings revealed that First Nations families of children with disabilities have many needs that are not adequately addressed, reinforcing the call for further improvements in lives of First Nations families with children with disabilities.

    An introduction to mindful practice: For staff working with children displaying challenging behaviours (Part 2)

    Speakers: Janine Montgomery, Brenda Stoesz

    In this presentation, we will present a summary of the relevant research findings as they relate to reducing stress in staff working with children displaying challenging behaviours. In particular, we will present an overview of the concepts of emotional intelligence and mindfulness practice and attendees will participate in exercises incorporating emotional intelligence and mindfulness to enable an introduction to incorporating concepts in their everyday lives to improve personal well-being and workplace effectiveness.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Learn basic background information about emotional intelligence and mindfulness.
    • Learn practical strategies to incorporate emotional intelligence and mindful living to enable reduced stress related to the challenges they face when working with individuals displaying challenging behaviours.
    • Be provided with resources to learn more about the concepts presented for those who wish to begin incorporating the ideas into daily living.
    Educational and Behavioral Programming to Accelerate Student Progress

    Speaker: Mary E. McDonald

    Students with autism spectrum disorders may demonstrate difficulty acquiring a particular skill or demonstrate inconsistent progress on their goals. This session will look at the many possible factors responsible for these difficulties. Assessment and intervention will be discussed as it applies to problem-solving student progress. The importance of stimulus control, use of creative teaching methods, selection of teaching materials, and the use of a clinical-problem solving model will be reviewed. Specific problem-solving strategies will be reviewed (e.g., formulating measurable goals, selecting the right data system, developing alternative teaching methods).

    Learning Objectives:

    • Identify at least 2 factors related to limited or inconsistent progress in students with ASD.
    • Identify steps to a clinical problem solving model.
    • Associate measurement systems with specific behavior.
    • Identify how stimulus control affects progress in both discrimination learning and generalization in students with ASD.
  • 12:00 P.M. - 1:00 P.M.
    Complimentary Banquet Lunch: Fort Garry Place Grand Ballroom
  • 1:00 P.M. - 2:00 P.M.
    Mindful Touch for Caregivers - Practical Applications (Part 1)

    Speaker: Andrew Terhoch

    Touch, communication and our awareness for an individual’s sensitivities can profoundly impact the care experiences that we create. From Hoyer lifts and wheelchair transport, to oral care and postural/positional changes, participants will explore a variety of caregiving experiences from a caregiver and a care-receiver perspective. 

    Learning Objectives:

    • Gain an understanding for using Mindful Touch as a guiding principle of care to support the creation of the most meaningful care experiences possible.
    • Experience first-hand, what a variety of sensory information can feel like to an individual with unique sensitivities related to difference in ability, illness or age. 
    • Practice and experience the Mindful Touch principles of care as caregiver and as a care-receiver through a variety of caregiving experience exercises.
    A motor learning approach to developing and maintaining eating skills in children and adults with intellectual and developmental disability (Part 1)

    Speaker: Justine Joan Sheppard

    This workshop focuses on skill development for biting, chewing, drinking from cup and straw, self-feeding and ability to maintain healthy pace for eating. Topics will include:

    • Stages in acquisition of each of the skills that lead to mature eating skills
    • Developmental hurdles in disability for acquiring mature eating skills
    • Use of evidence-based motor learning strategies to support advancing new skills and maintenance of existing skills

    Learning objectives:

    • Participants will be better able to identify the specific developmental disability in swallowing and eating.
    • Participants will be better able to select functional goals and objectives for advancing and maintaining skills.
    • Participants will be better able to select the appropriate strategies for supporting skill acquisition and maintenance.
    Renegotiating Reciprocity (Part 1)

    Speaker: Aaron Johannes

    Learning Objectives:

    • We will clarify the ideas of a “support network,” “community” and “reciprocity” together. 
    • We will talk about the changing role of community supports.
    • We will identify some ways in which we can focus on strengths and building networks in our work and relationships.  
    Building a Context for Relationships: Roles, Relationships and Places of Belonging (Part 1)

    Speaker: Janet Klees

    This is a presentation for staff, families and their allies who are serious about exploring and discovering the opportunities for welcomed engagement, and relationships that abound within our communities. If you are in planning mode for transition years, concerned with ensuring that a person is involved in their community in meaningful ways, or wanting to develop a person’s interests and potential in their everyday lives, then this workshop might be just for you!

    Learning Objectives:

    • To identify and plan for the four elements necessary for building a context in which a relationship is more likely to occur.
    • To understand that looking at roles rather than activities is a powerful way to help people spend their time in meaningful ways – and we can start doing so today.
    • To understand that at the heart of a valued role is contribution and to think of the contributions that people are able to offer in a different way.
    Building Resilience: Grounding your Body

    Speaker: Kalyn Falk

    Resilience is the ability to recover quickly from disruptive stress without being overwhelmed or acting in dysfunctional ways. It is a quality that can be developed with practice, using a variety of skills and attitudes to manage one’s body, mind and unresolvable situations.

    Learning objectives:

    • Acute stress can triggers a reaction into fight or flight mode – not a helpful space for thoughtful resilient responses. This workshop will cover techniques to manage the physical impact of stress, develop an awareness of stress triggers and reduce reactivity.
    Technology in Teaching:  Developing Innovative Teaching Methods for Individuals with ASD 

    Speaker: Mary E. McDonald

    This presentation will discuss ways in which to incorporate technology when teaching students with ASD. Specific areas of technology as they pertain to skill development will include use of iTouch/iPad, video technology and tactile prompts. A variety of other technology-based tools will be discussed. Specific areas of learning will focus on independence, communication and social skills.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Identify at least 2 ways in which technology can be incorporated in teaching students with ASD.
    • Describe 2 applications that can be used with the itouch/pad with students with ASD.
    • Describe the cautions when using apps to teach students with ASD.
    • Describe how video technology can be used to teach a variety of skills to students with ASD.
  • 2:10 P.M. - 3:10 P.M.
    Mindful Touch for Caregivers - Practical Applications (Part 2)

    Speaker: Andrew Terhoch

    Touch, communication and our awareness for an individual’s sensitivities can profoundly impact the care experiences that we create. From Hoyer lifts and wheelchair transport, to oral care and postural/positional changes, participants will explore a variety of caregiving experiences from a caregiver and a care-receiver perspective.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Gain an understanding for using Mindful Touch as a guiding principle of care to support the creation of the most meaningful care experiences possible.
    • Experience first-hand, what a variety of sensory information can feel like to an individual with unique sensitivities related to difference in ability, illness or age.
    • Practice and experience the Mindful Touch principles of care as caregiver and as a care-receiver through a variety of caregiving experience exercises.
    A motor learning approach to developing and maintaining eating skills in children and adults with intellectual and developmental disability (Part 2)

    Speaker: Justine Joan Sheppard

    This workshop focuses on skill development for biting, chewing, drinking from cup and straw, self-feeding and ability to maintain healthy pace for eating. Topics will include:

    • Stages in acquisition of each of the skills that lead to mature eating skills
    • Developmental hurdles in disability for acquiring mature eating skills
    • Use of evidence-based motor learning strategies to support advancing new skills and maintenance of existing skills

    Learning objectives:

    • Participants will be better able to identify the specific developmental disability in swallowing and eating.
    • Participants will be better able to select functional goals and objectives for advancing and maintaining skills.
    • Participants will be better able to select the appropriate strategies for supporting skill acquisition and maintenance.
    Renegotiating Reciprocity (Part 2)

    Speaker: Aaron Johannes

    Learning Objectives:

    • We will clarify the ideas of a “support network,” “community” and “reciprocity” together.
    • We will talk about the changing role of community supports.
    • We will identify some ways in which we can focus on strengths and building networks in our work and relationships.
    Building a Context for Relationships: Roles, Relationships and Places of Belonging (Part 2)

    Speaker: Janet Klees

    This is a presentation for staff, families and their allies who are serious about exploring and discovering the opportunities for welcomed engagement, and relationships that abound within our communities. If you are in planning mode for transition years, concerned with ensuring that a person is involved in their community in meaningful ways, or wanting to develop a person’s interests and potential in their everyday lives, then this workshop might be just for you!

    Learning Objectives:

    • To identify and plan for the four elements necessary for building a context in which a relationship is more likely to occur.
    • To understand that looking at roles rather than activities is a powerful way to help people spend their time in meaningful ways – and we can start doing so today.
    • To understand that at the heart of a valued role is contribution and to think of the contributions that people are able to offer in a different way.
    Building Resilience: Calming your Mind

    Speaker: Kalyn Falk

    Resilience is the ability to recover quickly from disruptive stress without being overwhelmed or acting in dysfunctional ways. It is a quality that can be developed with practice, using a variety of skills and attitudes to manage one’s body, mind and unresolvable situations.

    Learning objectives:

    • Negative assumptions and critical self-talk only serve to escalate stress. This session will focus on skills to keep the mind curious and open, and the inner saboteur at bay.
    Preference Assessment: What It Is and How To Do It / An iOS Preference Assessment App

    Speaker: Toby Martin

    Preference Assessment: What It Is and How To Do It
    This presentation will introduce and explore techniques of preference assessment, a systematic way to reliably identify things that will increase a person’s motivation and enjoyment. Preference assessment is especially valuable for individuals without expressive language, and can be adapted for persons with profound disabilities. Choice options can be presented to individuals in various ways (e.g. as objects, pictures, videos) depending on what is appropriate to the context and the person’s understanding. Various methods and techniques of preference assessment will be discussed, each with their own strengths and weaknesses. Attendees will be provided with practical tools that they can take away and apply to their own work.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Know what preference assessment is, and how it’s helpful.
    • Be able to choose the right preference assessment method for a given individual.
    • Be able to use an iOS application to deliver a preference assessment.

    An iOS Preference Assessment App
    Preference assessment can be a valuable tool for planning educational and leisure activities, but obtaining accurate results requires that the procedures are followed and recorded carefully. We have developed an iOS application that guides a teacher or caregiver through the delivery of complete preference assessments, records all of the person’s selections, and presents a detailed summary of relative preference. It’s even possible to use the app to present choice options (as pictures or video) to the individual who can choose by tapping the desired option. Attendees will learn about the preference assessment challenges that the app helps overcome, and will have a chance to use the app to practice performing an actual assessment.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Know what preference assessment is, and how it’s helpful.
    • Be able to choose the right preference assessment method for a given individual.
    • Be able to use an iOS application to deliver a preference assessment.
  • 3:10 P.M. - 3:30 P.M.
    Nutrition & Networking Break
  • 3:30 P.M. - 4:30 P.M.
    Mindful Touch for Caregivers - Practical Applications (Part 3)

    Speaker: Andrew Terhoch

    Touch, communication and our awareness for an individual’s sensitivities can profoundly impact the care experiences that we create. From Hoyer lifts and wheelchair transport, to oral care and postural/positional changes, participants will explore a variety of caregiving experiences from a caregiver and a care-receiver perspective.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Gain an understanding for using Mindful Touch as a guiding principle of care to support the creation of the most meaningful care experiences possible.
    • Experience first-hand, what a variety of sensory information can feel like to an individual with unique sensitivities related to difference in ability, illness or age.
    • Practice and experience the Mindful Touch principles of care as caregiver and as a care-receiver through a variety of caregiving experience exercises.
    Care giver collaboration for swallowing and feeding in the community-home setting

    Speaker: Justine Joan Sheppard

    This workshop focuses on the collaborative roles of clinicians and caregivers in the care of individuals with swallowing and feeding challenges. Topics will include; recognizing signs and symptoms of difficulty and their impact on daily activity; strategies for effective sharing of recommendations for eating, drinking and offering medications; strategies for effective implementation of recommendations for individuals with differing levels of difficulty; overcoming barriers to staff collaborations

    Learning objectives:

    • Participants will be better able to discuss issues involved in staff collaborations in care.
    • Participants will be better able to associate functional signs and symptoms of swallowing and feeding disorder with risks to health and safety.
    • Participants will be better able to use collaborative strategies to improve care of individuals with swallowing and feeding challenges.
    Renegotiating Reciprocity (Part 3)

    Speaker: Aaron Johannes

    Learning Objectives:

    • We will clarify the ideas of a “support network,” “community” and “reciprocity” together.
    • We will talk about the changing role of community supports.
    • We will identify some ways in which we can focus on strengths and building networks in our work and relationships.
    Having a Life: Participation in Communities by Families of Children with Complex Care Needs

    While we have some understanding of the impact caring for children with complex care needs has on families, little is known about how these families experience participation. This presentation will showcase findings from a longitudinal qualitative study that examined how the changing geographies of care influence the ways that 40 Canadian families with children with complex care needs participate in everyday life. The families’ stories raise questions of societal obligations to promote meaningful participation. This study lends support for further improvements that may enrich the lives of families with children with complex care needs.

    Building Resilience: Managing Unresolvable Situations

    Speaker: Kalyn Falk

    Resilience is the ability to recover quickly from disruptive stress without being overwhelmed or acting in dysfunctional ways. It is a quality that can be developed with practice, using a variety of skills and attitudes to manage one’s body, mind and unresolvable situations.

    Learning objectives:

    • Sometimes we face situations that are unresolvable. This session will explore how to maintain a strong sense of self and others by effectively managing the tension that exists between competing values and fears.
    Overview of self-management strategies and their effective use for individuals with Developmental Disabilities and Autism Spectrum Disorders in school, employment, and community settings

    Speaker: Keith Storey

    Self-management strategies have been successfully used in daily living and employment situations for persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders. In employment settings, developing self-management programs promote job independence and often free up the worker from external guidance and instruction. These strategies provide self-monitoring and control over work performance, socialization, hygiene and essential living skills. The focus of this presentation will be an overview of implementation of self-management procedures in community and supported employment settings. The co-presenters will provide strategies that research has found to be effective for supporting successful participation in the workplace and community for persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders. In addition to the overview of self-management strategies we will specifically focus on Auditory Prompting Procedures. A non-technical, easy to implement format will be used by the presenters.

    Learning Objectives:

    This proposal will further the skills or knowledge of conference participants by providing examples that have been empirically verified.