CCDDA DAY 1 - MORNING BANNER

8 am - 9 am Registration & Networking

9 am - 9:15 am Opening Remarks - Brenlee Carrington Trepel, Chairperson of the Manitoba Human Rights Commission

9:15 am - 10:15 am MORNING KEYNOTE: Ian Campeau & Jesse Wente

10:30 am - 11:45 am

11:45 am - 1pm Lunch Break

CCDDA DAY 1 AFTERNOON

1pm - 2 pm

  • Deborah Hatton - Defining Normal
  • Ben Adaman & Joe Gacheru - Listening to First Nation Children and their Families: the Manitoba Jordan’s Principle Circle of Care Approach
  • Peter Leidy - Whose Life Is It, Anyway?
  • Daphne Penrose - Manitoba Advocate for Children and Youth
  • Charlie Applestein - No Such Thing As a Bad Kid! Part 2
  • Yona Lunsky - There Is No Health Without Mental Health: Why mental health matters for people with developmental disabilities
  • Cara Milne - Cara’s Top Ideas for Community Building
  • Jason Dyck - Sawmill Tea & Coffee Co. – A Different Model for Community Building, Inclusion, and Training

2 pm - 2:20 pm Mid-Afternoon Break

2:20 pm - 3:20 pm

3:30 pm - 4:30 pm Keynote: Michael McCreary - Does This Make My Asperger’s Look Big?

CCDDA DAY 2 MORNING

8 am - 9 am Registration & Networking

9 am - 9:15 am Opening Remarks

9:15 am - 10:15 am MORNING KEYNOTE:  Keynote: Al Condeluci

10:30 am - 11:45 am

  • Panel: Employment - The Road to Quality Employment is Paved with Good Relationships
  • Chris Beesley - Building and Maintaining Collaborative Relationships with Families
  • Alysha Farrell - Storytelling as Advocacy: Acting Out to Build More Inclusive Organizations and Communities
  • Helen Trudeau - Jordan’s Principle Çhild First Initiative: Strengthening the Community Circle of Care for First Nations Children
  • Dennis Reid - Promoting Happiness Among Adults with Severe Disabilities
  • Andrew Gurza - What Service Providers Need to Know About Sexuality and Disability
  • Al Condeluci - Imagine a Community Where Each Belongs
  • Zoe Quinn- Social Media Engagement with Self Protection
CCDDA DAY 2 - AFTERNOON

1pm - 2 pm

  • Jino Distasio - From NIMBY to YIMBY: Shifting Paradigms in Urban Planning to Promote Inclusive Communities
  • Red Cross Manitoba - Respect in the Workplace
  • Mark Malady - Community Inclusion in Living Supports: Another option in the Continuum of Supports
  • Cathy Deagle-Gammon - DASC: How Mission Meets Business
  • Dennis Reid - OBM in Practice: Improving Staff Performance in Human Service Settings
  • Nirbhay Singh - Mindfulness for Direct Support Professionals
  • Al Condeluci - Imagine a Community Where Each Belongs
  • Angela Taylor - Supporting Exceptional Families

2 pm - 2:20 pm Mid-Afternoon Break

2:20 pm - 3:20 pm

  • Chris Beesley - Building and Maintaining Collaborative Relationships with Families
  • Mitch Bourbonniere - Creating a Sense of Belonging, Identity and Purpose Through Community Service
  • Janice Nesbitt - End-of-Life and Palliative Care in a Group Living Arrangement
  • Cathy Deagle-Gammon - SENNS: Social Enterprise Network of Nova Scotia – Building Your Network!
  • Zoe Quinn - Social Media Engagement with Self-protection
  • Stu Law - Behavioural Assessment: What does it mean to be human?
  • Lisa Morrisseau & Nikki Swirsky - Tools from Moms with FASD to those Working in Health and Education
  • Barrier-Free Manitoba - Accessibility in Manitoba`s Education System - From Cradle to Career

3:30 pm - 4:30 pm AFTERNOON KEYNOTE: Keynote: Keith MacPherson - Making Sense of Mindfulness

SESSION DESCRIPTIONS

Keynote: Ian Campeau & Jesse Wente

Panel: Carrington Trepel, Khan, Mitchell, Hansen & Shafer Breneel Carrington Trepel, Byron Williams, Isha Khan & Grant Mitchell – Advocating Through Human Rights Advocacy is about speaking out on Human Rights issues and taking action to improve a situation. Please join this panel as they explore the way the Human Rights Code can support advocates to ensure full lives for all people. This panel will focus on the principles of human rights and examine a path to help achieve the principles.

Andy Chavez & Annie Escalante – VR for Autism and Direct Care Planning Virtual reality has the potential to tap into a varied amount of teaching opportunities within limitless environments and settings. If programed correctly, VR simulations will have the potential to assess and teach a diverse and varied set of behaviors and contingencies, in a safe, controlled and effective manner. Many studies within neighboring fields have demonstrated its effectiveness in assisting individuals with anxiety, phobias and PTSD but the literature is limited in showcasing its use in teaching new skills. This presentation will discuss the use of VR in teaching and assessing within simulated settings and will also describe potential paths for virtual reality in differing contexts and situations

Patti Chiapetta & Laurie Miller – Relationships & Support Network Development – An Innovative Approach This session will be highly interactive, discussing the importance of relationships, focusing on support network development and sharing tools and best practices. The session will include short videos, power point presentation, lived experiences as well as tools, resources and best practices. There will be information about the evolution of support networks and practical skill development regarding person centered, support networks and innovation. Conference registrants will be engaged around the topic of relationships, friendships and support networks.

Caitlin Buchel – Find Your Healthy Voice 
Our voice is a crucial part of our identity and our ability to communicate at home, school and work. We often don’t realize the importance of our voice until we lose it. Maintaining good vocal hygiene is one way to protect your voice and your valuable ability to communicate. Vocal hygiene involves creating good voice habits that reduce the risk of developing voice problems and addressing them if they occur. This discussion will cover a number of vocal hygiene habits, useful in home and work environments, which can reduce your risk of voice difficulties and disorders. It will then highlight steps that you should take, if despite taking a proactive approach to vocal hygiene, you begin to encounter problems.

Charlie Applestein

– “No Such Thing as a Bad Kid!” Part 1
Strength-based practice is an emerging approach to guiding at-risk children and youth that is exceptionally positive and inspiring. It begins with the belief that every young person has or can develop strengths and utilize past successes to mitigate problem behavior and enhance functioning. This presentation will highlight some of the key principles and techniques of this transforming modality. Areas covered include: What is strength-based practice & the power of a positive attitude & culture; the effects of trauma and positive emotions on the brain; strength-based communication principles and techniques - including reframing, using solution-focused questions, positive predicting and inspirational metaphors; self-esteem building & activities for at-risk children and youth; how to help cognitively inflexible young people; and a host of creative cognitive behavioral strategies.

Nirbhay Singh

– Mindfulness for Direct Support Professionals

Cara Milne– How to Encourage Dignity and Responsibility 
How do we build up dignity? Cara will examine the significance of supporting genuine contribution and real responsibility in order to help people succeed. The conversation will include the consequences of what happens when we unintentionally get in the way of people connecting to the communities that surround them. You will also learn to try not to pass that crayon.

Anne Kersta

– level IT up Level IT Up is an innovative social enterprise in Manitoba whose goal is to increase the employability and employment of individuals with autism in science, technology, engineering and math. Using a comprehensive and fun recruitment process, participants are identified who have skills matching current market needs. Learn more about the development of this enterprise and its future endeavours as it responds to the needs of our local autism and information and communications technology communities. 11:45am – 1pm LUNCH 1pm – 2pm

Deborah Hatton – Defining Normal Have you ever wondered what defines normal, average, or just plain weird? How about what is abnormal and/or a handicap, and what is not? Have you heard of the “Ugly Laws”? These questions will be discussed as well how society handles these concepts. Recommendations will be suggested and examined.

Ben Adaman & Joe Gacheru – Listening to First Nation Children and their Families: The Manitoba Jordan’s Principle Circle of Care Approach Manitoba is the first region in Canada to adopt an integrated circle of care approach to the Jordan’s Principle Child First Initiative. Following the lead of communities across the province, Tribal Councils, specialized service providers, funders and other stake holders are working together to support children and their families. Joe Gacheru and Ben Adaman will be sharing their experience and their lessons learned. Peter Leidy – Whose Life Is It, Anyway? 
This session looks at power, control, and decision-making in support relationships. Is a person being assertive, or “non-compliant”?  In what ways can we choose power with rather than power over?  When a person is “placed” in a home she had no choice about, when a 51-year-old woman is told by her 24-year-old staff person that it is time for bed at 8:30 pm, when “outings” are scheduled only twice a week for a very active young adult – it raises questions like “Who is making the choice here?” “Who gets to decide?” “Whose life IS it, anyway?" Daphne Penrose – Manitoba Advocate for Children and Youth The Manitoba government is introduced a new Advocate for Child and Youth Act on March 15th. Daphne Penrose will explain what some of the new legislation aims to do, moving beyond the Child and Family Services (CFS) system, including the capacity for us to begin to advocate for children and family broadens significantly. Charlie Applestein – “No Such Thing As A Bad Kid!”Part 2
Strength-based practice is an emerging approach to guiding at-risk children and youth that is exceptionally positive and inspiring. It begins with the belief that every young person has or can develop strengths and utilize past successes to mitigate problem behavior and enhance functioning. This presentation will highlight some of the key principles and techniques of this transforming modality. Areas covered include: What is strength-based practice & the power of a positive attitude & culture; the effects of trauma and positive emotions on the brain; strength-based communication principles and techniques - including reframing, using solution-focused questions, positive predicting and inspirational metaphors; self-esteem building & activities for at-risk children and youth; how to help cognitively inflexible young people; and a host of creative cognitive behavioral strategies. Yona Lunsky - Improving Access to Health Care Nearly one in every two adults with developmental disabilities has a psychiatric diagnosis. Yet, most of our broader efforts to address mental health fail to include them. In this session, Yona will identify some of the biggest current mental health challenges facing our sector, and offer seven promising directions, based on Ontario based research, clinical practice, and lessons I have learned from my own mistakes. Cara Milne – Cara’s Top Ideas for Community Building This practical session will focus on a variety of ways we can build up communities for people who are vulnerable. Cara will focus on examples of each idea – and the first steps for these practical opportunities in community building. Real conversations around barriers and challenges will help staff feel prepared to come away from this session with an idea that “just might work!” Prairie Partners Inc. Jason Dyck – Sawmill Tea & Coffee Co, - A Different Model for Community Building, Inclusion, and Training Eleven years ago Prairie Partners Inc, a small community non-profit agency that supports people with developmental disabilities, looked at their struggling organization and their closed-to-the-public sheltered workshop, and asked themselves: How can we support people living with disabilities better? What is our community missing? Basically, we need connection! We need a place where everyone can feel that they belong! We need to bring more opportunities and services to areas where there are very few. On the front door of the Sawmill café is a sign that says “no purchase neccessary” and “bag lunches are welcome”. This is a different approach to business! This is where community engagement is the first priority, and then follows the belief that if people feel they belong, then they will feel a desire to support the enterprise. On any given day you will find adults and youth with disabilities and barriers to employment training and working. You may find the local knitting circle congregating around a pot of tea. You might see local clergy, professionals, farmers, construction workers, parents and young children, milling about and interacting. Two local school divisions send their students with developmental disabilities for some additional opportunities in their education and training. The café also hosts special community gatherings, weddings, events, concerts, and informative presentations. It has become the hub, the beating heart of our community. This is the Sawmill Tea & Coffee Co.! 2pm - 2:20pm BREAK 2:20pm – 3:20pm Dalip Shekhawat and Maria Lulashnyk – Work it Out – Vocational Circuits for Self-Regulation “Vocational Circuit” was developed by St.Amant School and Clinical Services collaboration to work on areas where students would learn to follow directions, use proper body mechanics, learn self-regulation, gain confidence and improve work habits and attitudes. Jennifer Katz: Universal Design for Learning - Inclusion Building inclusive learning communities requires that students see school as a place where they belong, are valued, and have something to contribute. The Three Block Model of Universal Design for Learning is an effective approach to classroom management, planning, instruction, and assessment that creates a compassionate learning community from K-12. Service delivery is framed around an RTI/MTSS pedagogy. The model has been implemented in schools across Canada, and has been shown to increase student engagement, academic achievement (including reading comprehension and critical thinking), self-concept, respect for diverse others, prosocial behavior, mental health, and teacher satisfaction and self-efficacy. This workshop will provide an overview of the framework. Sample units, lessons, video, and student work will be shared. Peter Leidy – Shoulder to Shoulder: Valuing and Celebrating the Important Work of Direct Support Professionals 
In a field prone to low pay, low status, and high turnover, we need to embrace the importance of truly valuing and honoring the people providing day-to-day support. The work is critically important. Direct support professionals have a lot to say about what's necessary to keep them committed to, and engaged in, their work. Are we listening? This session will challenge, inspire, and make you laugh. Hien Nguyen, Charisse Dimacali & Tracy Laluk - Volunteer Services – Natural Supports through the PALS Program
A critical piece of quality of life is missing for people with developmental disabilities and autism and that is friendship and unpaid relationships. Join staff from St.Amant’s PALS Project Team to learn about their natural supports model, called Partnership through Activities Learning and Sharing (PALS) to help address this issue. They’re matching volunteers who are looking for a friend with people supported by St.Amant who are also looking for a friend. They will share their resources and processes with those looking for natural supports through this model in the hope of helping others make long-lasting connections. Charlie Applestein – “No Such Thing As A Bad Kid!”Part 3
Strength-based practice is an emerging approach to guiding at-risk children and youth that is exceptionally positive and inspiring. It begins with the belief that every young person has or can develop strengths and utilize past successes to mitigate problem behavior and enhance functioning. This presentation will highlight some of the key principles and techniques of this transforming modality. Areas covered include: What is strength-based practice & the power of a positive attitude & culture; the effects of trauma and positive emotions on the brain; strength-based communication principles and techniques - including reframing, using solution-focused questions, positive predicting and inspirational metaphors; self-esteem building & activities for at-risk children and youth; how to help cognitively inflexible young people; and a host of creative cognitive behavioral strategies. Yona Lunsky - Quality health care and developmental disability: Are we there yet? What does it mean to deliver quality health care to youth and adults with developmental disabilities and their families? We have important guidelines here in Canada and from other jurisdictions on the way we should provide care, as well as many helpful resources which can help us make quality health care a reality. Moving these guidelines into practice continues to be a challenge. In this session, Yona will reflect on strategies which have helped push forward changes in primary and emergency care in Ontario, and share some tools and resources developed for this purpose. Cara Milne - Supporting People with Disabilities in their Homes and Neighbourhoods This workshop will explore the important shift from people being a guest, to belonging at home and in their neighbourhoods. There will be a focus on supporting vulnerable people to find meaning, connection, responsibility and ownership right where they live. Stories and examples around supporting people with mealtimes, hosting and connecting with neighbours will leave staff equipped to build community at home! Dale Kendall, Sid Rogers and Bob Jones – Future of Institutions 3:30pm – 4:30pm Afternoon Keynote Speaker: Michael McCreary – AspieComic 
Twenty-two year old Michael McCreary was diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome at the age of five. At age 13, in an act of self-preservation - combined with the desire for constant attention and the inability to stop talking - he began stand-up comedy. In the past 5 years he has performed stand-up shows, keynote addresses and panel presentations in every province in Canada and across the United States. DAY 2 WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31 8am – 9am REGISTRATION & NETWORKING SESSION 9:15am - 10:15am Keynote Speaker: Al Condeluci – Imagine the Power and Potency of Social Capital All of us are interested in a better community where all people have an opportunity for accessible and affordable homes, jobs or meaningful daytime opportunities and lifestyles of their choice. In spite of our many years of work on this goal, the outcomes in this area are still not satisfactory for people who are vulnerable due to disability or other compromises. Many of these vulnerable people and their families find themselves in isolated situations with limited options for friendships and important social relationships. This presentation takes a close look at the reasons why our systems have not been more successful in these goals, defines and delineates the concept of social capital, and offers a community building perspective designed to shift the culture to be more inclusive and supportive to all people. 10:30am – 11:45am Employment Panel – The Road to Quality Employment is Paved with Good Relationships
Employment plays a critical role in our lives, the impact of which exceeds beyond the obvious economic benefits. Good quality relationships influence our successes in life and the same holds true for PWD, in this case in regards to their employment successes. We will examine the correlations between building mutually respectful beneficial relationships and successful employment outcomes amongst job seekers, support professionals and employers. Hear from a panel of employers, employees with disabilities, and supporters their lived experiences with negotiating the world of work. Chris Beesley - Building and Maintaining Collaborative Relationships with Families Alysha Farrel – Storytelling as Advocacy: Acting Out to Build More Inclusive Organizations and Communities 
This session will focus on the power of storytelling through drama as a practice of self-advocacy. Participants will explore how the arts can expose and challenge oppressive understandings of disability in relation to commonplace activities. This session will offer strategies to those who are interested in working together to flip the script on bodily normativity in their communities, schools or organizations. Helen Trudeau – Jordan’s Principle 
The purpose of Jordan’s Principle community-based initiatives are to develop community programs that will provide quality services, supports and resources at the community level to achieve the desired holistic outcomes for children and their families living with disabilities. In order to do this, First Nations must lead the work with all stakeholders to provide support, address gaps in service, avoid jurisdictional disputes and improve needed care, while keeping children home in their respective communities. Dennis Reid –Promoting Happiness among Adults with Severe Disabilities: Evidence-Based Strategies This presentation will describe strategies for promoting day-to-day happiness among adults who have severe disabilities. Initially, the importance of daily happiness on overall quality of life will be stressed, along with happiness being considered a private event that is amenable only to indirect assessment. Next, means of identifying and validating indices of happiness and unhappiness will be presented for individuals who have serious difficulties describing these private emotional events. Ways to observe ongoing indices of happiness and unhappiness will then be discussed. Subsequently, evidence-based strategies for increasing happiness and decreasing unhappiness during daily routines will be presented. Periodically during the presentation reference will be made to research providing the evidence base for the strategies that are discussed. Andrew Gurza: What Service Providers Need to Know About Sexuality and Disability 
This session is an intersectional look at sexuality and disability, and will introduce you to some of the emotional realities of being sexually active and disabled. Using Andrew’s personal and lived experience of disability, the presentation will also explore disabled people’s complicated relationship with service agencies and providers especially when bringing up sexuality and disability. Most importantly, this session will look at the essential things service providers and agencies need to know about the lived experience of sex and disability. Zoe Quinn – Social Media Engagement with Self Protection Quinn discusses her experience in detail from her perspective, giving a picture of the social web both as a place where a weird, queer, socially isolated kid from the sticks could make a home and start a career – and where that same person could suddenly have their life turned upside down by a gleeful, hateful and disturbingly persistent mob. She will share the tools she gathered to protect herself and others from negative online engagement. Al Condeluci: Imagine a Community Where Each Belongs Part 1 Related to the morning keynote, this session will be an interactive and deeper look at strategies and actions for building inclusive communities. The 4 key steps of building social capital will be explored and examined and participants will have opportunity to develop a blueprint for action. In addition, the ways and means to sustain the effort over time will be examined. 11:45am – 1pm LUNCH 1pm – 2pm Jino Distasio: From NIMBY to YIMBY: Shifting Paradigms in Urban Planning to Promote Inclusive Communities 
Inclusive communities begin with ensuring we have the right tools to better plan and achieve inclusive neighbourhoods that offer all a place to call home. However, community change often brings conflict over uncertainty. Moving from NIMBY to YIMBY is about having municipal tools and good processes to support inclusivity. This session draws on housing and planning practices that have had a positive impact.   Red Cross – Respect in the Workplace The purpose of the Respect in the Workplace presentation is to empower all employees to spot and understand workplace bullying, harassing and discriminating behaviours and to eliminate these harmful behaviours in a mutually respectful, self-empowering way for a safer, healthier workplace. Mark Maladay – Community Inclusion in Living Supports: Another option in the Continuum of Supports Historically adults with Intellectual (Dis)abilities have had limited options when it comes to community based living, most common includes the 24-hour home model to housing supports. This presentation will focus on an additional option that is included for adults with Intellectual (Dis)abilities in the state of Nevada. The shared living arrangement or host home model has actually been around for over 30 years however over the past 10 years several states and countries have been adopting the model.  The current presentation will discuss a systems analysis of living supports, data related to a transition from 24 hour Living Arrangements to the Host Home model and general data related to community integration for recipients of this type of support from a non-profit provider in Reno, NV over a 3 year period. Cathy Deagle-Gammon - DASC: How Mission Meets Business As a non-profit organization DASC (Dartmouth Adult Service Centre) provides a variety of programs and services for persons with an intellectual disability and those with dual diagnosis. The Mission of DASC, in association with our community, is to provide opportunities for adults with an intellectual disability and support them in realizing individual potential. Social Enterprise is one way that we engage with our community through business. In this session we will take you on our journey of sustaining our social enterprises, closing one, starting a new business and investigating yet another new business. Dennis Reid - Organizational Behavior Management in Practice: Improving Staff Performance in Human Service Settings This presentation will describe an evidence-based protocol for working with staff in the human services to promote work quality and enjoyment. Initially, the importance of promoting work quality and staff enjoyment will be discussed. Next, application of the protocol will be described, including ways to specify desired staff performance, train relevant work skills effectively and efficiently, monitor staff performance in a manner acceptable to staff, support proficient work performance, and correct insufficient performance. Discussion of the supervisory and consultative strategies will be supplemented with summaries of research that provides the evidence base of the recommendations. Nirbhay Singh - Mindfulness Angela Taylor – Supporting Exceptional Families This session will feature a discussion of best practice research about family-centered practice, reviewed and adapted by families that include children with differences. How can we support, empower, and encourage children who have neurological and intellectual needs, within our increasingly limited resources? How can we engage meaningfully with their caregivers? Specific communication tools to improve trust and safety in relationships with families, from introductions, extended to transition planning. An invitation to gain understanding and perspective directly from a family narrative, from a researcher who grew up as a child with disabilities and who raises children with diverse needs, within the services we provide. Al Condeluci - Imagine a Community Where Each Belongs Part 2 Related to the morning keynote, this session will be an interactive and deeper look at strategies and actions for building inclusive communities. The 4 key steps of building social capital will be explored and examined and participants will have opportunity to develop a blueprint for action. In addition, the ways and means to sustain the effort over time will be examined. 2pm - 2:20pm BREAK 2:20pm – 3:20pm Chris Beasley – Building and Maintaining Collaborative Relationships with Families Mitch Bourbonniere: Creating a Sense of Belonging, Identity and Purpose Through Community Service… A Blueprint for Anyone Regardless of Challenges or Abilities 
Mitch has spent much of his career working with young people with cognitive and developmental challenges. Part of his work with these young people is to build their self-esteem, confidence, sense of empathy and social skills. The vehicle that Mitch uses to accomplish this is through citizenship, volunteerism, and positive activism. Mitch will describe his work with young people volunteering with Mama Bear Clan, Got Bannock, Drag the Red, Teddy Bear's Picnic, and the Indigenous Pavilion at Folklorama. Janice Nesbitt: End-of-Life and Palliative Care in a Group Living Arrangement 
Individuals living with disabilities are able to lead full and productive lives with the support of their families, direct service workers, site supervisors and clinical managers. Eventually, they will reach a point in which they are in their final months, weeks and days of life. In these situations, it is often desirable for them to spend their final days at home, surrounded by those who know them best. This presentation will discuss how we might recognize when we need to prepare for end-of-life, and what steps support the individual, families and the care team during this transition and though to death at home. Cathy Deagle-Gammon – SENNS - Social Enterprise Network of Nova Scotia – Building your Network This session describes how “with great food, good company and like minds” we formed the Social Enterprise Network of Nova Scotia and how we together created the Sector Strategy and Government Framework for social enterprise in our province. It’s like having a great dinner party, find the host, decide who to invite, what will you serve, know the allergies and intolerances, imagine what the dessert is – what makes the event a success. Simple Recipe and by the way I don’t cook! Zoe Quinn – Social Media Engagement with Self Protection Quinn discusses her experience in detail from her perspective, giving a picture of the social web both as a place where a weird, queer, socially isolated kid from the sticks could make a home and start a career – and where that same person could suddenly have their life turned upside down by a gleeful, hateful and disturbingly persistent mob. She will share the tools she gathered to protect herself and others from negative online engagement. Stu Law – Behavioral Assessment – What does it mean to be Human? Historically behavioral assessment has been from an eliminative approach. Eliminative approaches to assessment focus on barriers to typical functioning versus on a descriptive account of the person in that specific context at that particular time. The descriptive view of a person is equally compatible with a behavioral approach. The I Strive assessment was developed by HSI/WARC from 2014-2017 and is designed to look at the totality of a person’s skill sets from the time of their birth to the time of their death. I Strive is based on applied behavior analysis, behavioral philosophy, and is strongly influenced by precision teaching and relational frame theory.  The domains of the assessment as well as specific data of over 60 participants per item will be reviewed and discussed in the context of current theoretical approaches to providing supports to people with disabilities, such as person-centered planning, dignity of risk, and person-first language. Barrier Free Manitoba – Accessibility in Manitoba’s Education System – From Cradle to Career Lisa Morrisseau and Nikki Swirsky – Tools from Moms with FASD to those Working in Health and Education This presentation features two speakers from Visions and Voices, a Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) speaker’s bureau of the Touchstone FASD program. Through this presentation participants will gain insight into working with individuals and families with FASD. As Nikki and Lisa share their experiences of navigating health and education systems, they will offer practical tools for better practice. 3:30pm – 4:30pm Afternoon Keynote Speaker: Keith MacPherson – Making Sense of Mindfullness In this dynamic presentation and workshop, Mindfulness Coach, Keith Macpherson demystifies the meaning and practice of mindfulness and offers concrete and practical tools and strategies to apply mindfulness to one’s everyday life. One can expect to gain a deeper awareness into how to de-stress, reclaim a proper work-life balance and live the life they are imagining through Keith’s five step framework towards a more mindful and fulfilling life. Keith integrates music, movement and group interaction into his presentations to ensure a dynamic learning environment that will support the projected outcomes and assist the participants in experiencing personal growth. Discover what has been stopping you from living a mindful life and expect to come away with a new outlook on how you can truly convert stress and burnout into successful inner peace and balance. 

Keynote: Keith MacPherson

Panel: Employment

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Keynote: Ian Campeau & Jesse Wente